• Roots in Jamaica & the Caribbean

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    Roots in Jamaica From its origins in Jamaica, with dub plates spinning on the sound systems of Trenchtown, Reggae music has had an undeniable cultural influence around the world. However no musical genre can be isolated from its historical background and Reggae is no exception. Read on as we take a journey back in time spanning over 50 years…. The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade The Caribbean … Read more

  • Sound Systems & Migration to the UK

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    Sound System Culture & Dubplates Sound systems were and remain an intrinsic part of Caribbean music and culture. Giant walls of speakers, turntables and powerful generators pumped out music, from the back of trucks, to a loyal audience. Before there even were people buying headphones when on a budget as they jog, large speakers roam the streets sometimes. Accompanied by food and drink, to make … Read more

  • The Rise of Dub & Reggae

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    UK Reggae Sound Systems The 70s saw the rise of the live DJ, previously earning their reputation through radio studios UK sound systems like Saxon Sound, Channel One and Jah Shaka grew in popularity though playing the latest music at live events. Setting up banks of powerful large speakers on the road or from the back of their vans, these pioneering DJs introduced exclusive dubplates … Read more

  • The Birth of the Bristol Sound

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    Ska Revival! The 2-Tone Record Label & Dub-Poets The early 80s saw a big revival of Ska, primarily through the 2-Tone record label in the UK. Distinctive black and white graphics on record sleeves featured Rude Boys in two-tone suits and loafers, which were the fashion of the day. 2 Tone produced a string of hits including ‘Too Much Pressure’ by The Selecter (1980) and … Read more

  • Reggae Inspiration & Sub-genres

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     Reggae in the Mainstream Reggae continued its global rise through the 1990s. British artist Maxi Priest had a US No 1 with ‘Close to You’ (1990),   whilst his cousin Jacob Miller had a global hit with band Inner Circle on ‘Sweat (A La La La La Long)’ (1993). American/Jamaican artist Shaggy’s music went global with ‘Oh Carolina’ (1993) and ‘Mr Bombastic’ (1995). 1994 proved … Read more